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Apart from the functionality and ascetics of the resourceful application; the first thing I noticed was this application’s name, or lack of it. Despite it’s personal graphic depicting a “pass” sign (as in passing a home inspection successfully) the app is called “Home Inspection Ready…etc” which isn’t exactly catchy or easy to remember; this has nothing to do with the quality of the app, but it definitely takes away from it’s chances at viral success and marketability. After easily downloading the application from Apple’s app store, the app can be launched while you are first given a blank “guides” page featuring nothing but a short description of what these property guides really are.

The page also notifies you that you currently have “no guides selected” and rather than having the guides list right on that same page, you must click a “categories” menu accompanied by what seems to be a confusing “previous page” looking arrow. Once you navigate to this categories menu however, things begin to look and feel better; you can choose from a host of major property components separated into indoor and outdoor containers. Here you select property componenets such as “roof” or “basement” and receive information on what type of condition and features these things need when your property is inspected. Not only does this guide feature a comprehensive list as to what each property component needs, it also acts as an interactive spreadsheet where the user can make condition reports and special notes.

After going through each part of the property and leaving notes and ratings on each component, the user’s feedback is compiled into an integrated list which can be easily accessed along the apps main, bottom menu. This recorded feedback is stored in the personalized logs menu, and allows the user to see exactly what they recorded when going through the house guide. Perhaps the best function of the Home Inspection Ready app is the third tab along the main bottom menu, the automatic “To-Do list”, which features every component of the property the user rated negatively or left a special note about. This tab basically acts as the property’s easily accessible improvement list, and is automatically created as the user goes through the initial property guide. The fourth and final tab along the main menu is a bit of a disappointment, it is labeled “info” and contains a conglomeration of last minute property inspection information and totally separate app development info.

The typeface is overly bland and the headers are lackluster at best. The information tab and the data it contains feels out of place and cheap. Ultimately, what I like about the app is the comprehensive guides that include the ability to rate and record organized information on every critical detail of a given property. I also love the auto-created to-do list that features any necessary information recorded while completing the property guide. What I don’t like is the accessibility of the ‘categories’ within the guide tab, and the way they are initially presented after launching the app. I also think the fourth tab in the main menu is out of place and poorly planned as I don’t think developer information has any place along the forefront of the apps service. Despite a few placement issues, this app boasts useful and integrated features consciously designed with the property owners needs in mind.

Worth Having App – Download the App